The Scientist

» psychology, culture and evolution

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image: Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

By | September 3, 2015

Online scientific journals are sacrificing the quality of research articles to make a buck.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2015

Brain Storms, Orphan, Maize for the Gods, and Paranoid.


image: Contributors


By | September 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

1 Comment

image: Hear and Now

Hear and Now

By | September 1, 2015

Auditory research advances worth shouting about


image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2015

September 2015's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: The Upside

The Upside

By | September 1, 2015

Researchers explore the benefits of hearing loss and impairment.


image: Aural History

Aural History

By | September 1, 2015

The form and function of the ears of modern land vertebrates cannot be understood without knowing how they evolved.

1 Comment

image: Psychology’s Failure to Replicate

Psychology’s Failure to Replicate

By | August 31, 2015

Researchers react to the finding that most of 100 studies recently analyzed were not reproducible.


image: Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

By | August 27, 2015

Scientific journals that publish papers with snappier titles accrue more citations per paper, according to a report.


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