The Scientist

» psychology, disease/medicine and microbiology

Most Recent

Family members with a certain gene variant had unnecessary interventions, highlighting the potential hazards of precision medicine.

2 Comments

image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

4 Comments

image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

0 Comments

image: Mice Display Human-Like Sense of Body Awareness

Mice Display Human-Like Sense of Body Awareness

By | October 27, 2016

Mice can be tricked into thinking rubber tails belong to them, indicating they perceive body ownership similar to the way humans do.

0 Comments

image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | October 24, 2016

Virus’s effect on RNA methylation; identifying brain cells targeted by Zika; virus found in vaginal secretions for two weeks after infection; updated CDC recommendations for Miami

0 Comments

image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

1 Comment

Once implanted in mice, the edited stem cells produced normal hemoglobin.

0 Comments

image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

4 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Evolutionary History of Dogs
  4. Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall
AAAS