The Scientist

» psychology and ecology

Most Recent

image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

0 Comments

image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

0 Comments

image: Gambling on Reproducibility

Gambling on Reproducibility

By | November 10, 2015

New research finds that observers placing bets in a stock exchange–like environment are pretty good at predicting the replicability of psychology studies.

0 Comments

image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

0 Comments

image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2015

Brain Storms, Orphan, Maize for the Gods, and Paranoid.

0 Comments

image: The Upside

The Upside

By | September 1, 2015

Researchers explore the benefits of hearing loss and impairment.

0 Comments

image: Psychology’s Failure to Replicate

Psychology’s Failure to Replicate

By | August 31, 2015

Researchers react to the finding that most of 100 studies recently analyzed were not reproducible.

2 Comments

image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  4. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
AAAS