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image: Review: <em>Errors of the Human Body</em>

Review: Errors of the Human Body

By | April 11, 2013

This dramatic science fiction film follows a grieving father using his research to understand his infant son’s gruesome death—and explores the culture and ethics of science along the way.

5 Comments

image: Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

By | April 8, 2013

Scientists are stumped as to why hundreds of starved pups have been washing up on the California shore.

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image: Review: Gossamer Gallants

Review: Gossamer Gallants

By | April 5, 2013

The insect-inspired dance by choreographer Paul Taylor strikes the perfect balance between six-legged realism and artistic fancy.

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image: Cancer Growth Curtailed

Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Mighty Modifications

Mighty Modifications

By | April 1, 2013

Histone acetylation levels keep intracellular pH in check.

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image: Bridges for UK Water Voles

Bridges for UK Water Voles

By | March 20, 2013

Newly constructed ramps will expand the habitat available to a colony of water voles in London, and similar ramps elsewhere could encourage isolated populations to mix.   

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image: La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

By | March 15, 2013

The sculptures of Mara G. Haseltine's new exhibition tell a tale of beautiful oceans ravaged by pollution.

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image: Love Song for an Ailing Planet

Love Song for an Ailing Planet

By | March 15, 2013

Artist Mara G. Haseltine unveils her latest exhibition of science-inspired sculpture, a melancholy ode to marine plankton set to the music of Puccini.

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image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

2 Comments

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