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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Anti-Vax Flick Pulled from Film Festival

Anti-Vax Flick Pulled from Film Festival

By | March 28, 2016

Tribeca Film Festival organizers reverse their decision to screen a documentary by discredited researcher Andrew Wakefield.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Simulating Scientific Sabotage, For Fun

Simulating Scientific Sabotage, For Fun

By | January 29, 2016

With a card game, researchers make light of the “wacky aspects of scientific research.”

4 Comments

image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Channeling Animals

Channeling Animals

By | November 25, 2015

Artists reinterpret structures built by birds, insects, and corals in a new exhibit.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Exploring the Inner Universe

Exploring the Inner Universe

By | November 6, 2015

A new American Museum of Natural History exhibit introduces visitors to the microbes within their bodies. 

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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