The Scientist

» culture Friday and evolution

Most Recent

image: For the Love of Plants

For the Love of Plants

By | July 10, 2015

Meet botanical illustrator Mindy Lighthipe, who practices environmental activism through art.

1 Comment

image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

1 Comment

image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

3 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes

5 Comments

image: Roos Are Mainly South Paws

Roos Are Mainly South Paws

By | June 22, 2015

A new study shows that kangaroos are predominantly left-handed.

2 Comments

image: Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar

Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar

By | June 12, 2015

The predatory toxins employed by animals separated by millions of years of evolution are virtually identical, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act

Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act

By | June 10, 2015

Researchers in Africa observe chimpanzees stealing palm wine from villagers’ cups and imbibing the beverage.

0 Comments

image: Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

By | June 8, 2015

Dubbed “Hellboy,” the triceratops relative sports a bevy of horns on its crested cranium.

0 Comments

In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech