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image: Laser-Guided Chastity

Laser-Guided Chastity

By | July 1, 2014

Scientists devise a precision-targeted system for training, tracking, and tweaking fruit fly social behavior.

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image: Let’s Talk About Sex

Let’s Talk About Sex

By | July 1, 2014

In lieu of a career in punk rock, James Pfaus opted to study the brain signals underlying sexual behavior and then see what happened when he manipulated them.


image: Running Mice Regain Vision

Running Mice Regain Vision

By | June 27, 2014

Exposure to visual stimuli while running restores vision to mice blind in one eye. 


image: Week in Review: June 23–27

Week in Review: June 23–27

By | June 27, 2014

Tracking chikungunya virus; reconsidering wood decay-based fungal classification; ASC specks spread inflammation; antibiotic tolerance in E. coli; RIKEN review yields corrections


image: Re-examining Rots

Re-examining Rots

By | June 23, 2014

Fungi that digest wood in novel ways could fuel new avenues of research on cellulosic ethanol, and suggest a need to move beyond traditional classification systems.  

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image: BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

By | June 9, 2014

An advisory committee for the BRAIN Initiative says that to fully fund the goals of the neuroscience research program, taxpayers should fork over $4.5 billion.


image: Leptin’s Effects

Leptin’s Effects

By | June 2, 2014

The hormone leptin, which signals fullness to animals, acts not only through neurons but through glia, too.

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image: Nutrient-Sensing Neurons

Nutrient-Sensing Neurons

By | June 1, 2014

Using just three dopaminergic neurons, Drosophila larvae can sense whether a food source lacks a full roster of essential amino acids.

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image: Kavli Congrats

Kavli Congrats

By | May 30, 2014

A nonet of scientists, including researchers in nano-optics and in the neuroscience of memory, earned the 2014 Kavli prizes.


image: Brains vs. Biceps?

Brains vs. Biceps?

By | May 29, 2014

Early humans may have made an evolutionary tradeoff, giving up muscular strength to fuel bigger brains.

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