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image: The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

By | July 17, 2017

Did behaviors that seem ingrained become fixed through epigenetic mechanisms and ancestral learning?

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image: Messing with the Microbiome

Messing with the Microbiome

By | July 17, 2017

Two new techniques allow researchers to manipulate the activity of gut bacteria. 

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image: Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

By | July 14, 2017

Researchers develop a method that combines the strengths of shotgun metagenomics and single-cell genome sequencing in a microfluidics-based platform.

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image: Behavior Circuits Mapped in Whole Fruit Fly Brain

Behavior Circuits Mapped in Whole Fruit Fly Brain

By | July 13, 2017

Using machine learning, researchers have created extensive maps of the neuronal circuits associated with social and locomotion behaviors in the fruit fly. 

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image: Electrical Stimulation Steers Neural Stem Cells

Electrical Stimulation Steers Neural Stem Cells

By | July 3, 2017

Current can guide implanted cells away from rats’ noses toward a region deep in their brains.

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image: Image of the Day: Gold Matter

Image of the Day: Gold Matter

By | June 30, 2017

The white matter tracts that wind throughout this microetching are based on diffusion spectrum imaging data from a human brain, realistically portraying the circuits found within a sagittal brain section.

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image: Memories Erased from Snail Neurons

Memories Erased from Snail Neurons

By | June 28, 2017

Scientists block particular enzymes to remove the cellular signatures associated with specific memory types.  

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image: Crystallography Innovator Dies

Crystallography Innovator Dies

By | June 26, 2017

Philip Coppens, who developed photocrystallography, has passed away at age 86.

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image: How Roundworms Sleep

How Roundworms Sleep

By | June 22, 2017

When Caenorhabditis elegans surrenders to slumber, the majority of its neurons fall silent.

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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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