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PerkinElmer

The Scientist

» chemistry and immunology

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image: Computational Chemistry Wins Nobel

Computational Chemistry Wins Nobel

By | October 9, 2013

Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of computer-based methods to model complex systems.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2013

Rocket Girl, The Cancer Chronicles, Abominable Science!, and The Sports Gene

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

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image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

image: New “Legal Highs” On The Rise

New “Legal Highs” On The Rise

By | June 27, 2013

Amateur chemists are creating new recreational drugs at such a rate that governments cannot keep up.  

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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image: Snapshots of Shifting Bonds

Snapshots of Shifting Bonds

By | June 3, 2013

Researchers use atomic force microscopy to produce stunning images of a molecule reconfiguring its atomic bonds.  

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Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

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image: Macrophages Drive Regeneration

Macrophages Drive Regeneration

By | May 22, 2013

The activity of one type of immune cell helps regrow the limbs of amputated salamanders.

3 Comments

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