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image: Virtual Reaction

Virtual Reaction

By | October 20, 2014

A computer simulation could predict antibiotic resistance.

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image: A Conversation with a Laureate

A Conversation with a Laureate

By | October 13, 2014

The Scientist speaks with W.E. Moerner, who last week shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on super-resolution molecular imaging.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Illustrating Alchemy, 18th Century

Illustrating Alchemy, 18th Century

By | September 1, 2014

As the science of chemistry developed, public perceptions of alchemists shifted from respect to ridicule.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Award-winning Chemist Dies

Award-winning Chemist Dies

By | July 14, 2014

Carlos Barbas III, a renowned organic chemist whose research helped in drug development, passed away at age 49. 

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image: Agreement Reached in Lab Fire Case

Agreement Reached in Lab Fire Case

By | June 25, 2014

A University of California, Los Angeles chemist facing criminal charges after a lab accident that killed his research assistant in 2009 avoids a public trial and jail time.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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