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image: One-Man NIH, 1887

One-Man NIH, 1887

By | June 4, 2011

As epidemics swept across the United States in the 19th century, the US government recognized the pressing need for a national lab dedicated to the study of infectious disease. 

27 Comments

image: The Anatomy of a High

The Anatomy of a High

By | June 3, 2011

When someone snorts or smokes cocaine, which is composed of small crystalline alkaloid molecules, the drug enters the bloodstream and from there eventually crosses into the heart, brain, and other organs. 

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image: Part Human, Part HIV

Part Human, Part HIV

By | June 3, 2011

Like other enveloped viruses, HIV exits its host cell enshrouded in the cell’s membrane, which contains membrane molecules such as the human leukocyte antigens (HLA). 

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image: Arsenic-based life debate continues

Arsenic-based life debate continues

By | June 2, 2011

More than a dozen researchers voice their concerns about a 2010 paper that claims bacteria can use arsenic in place of phosphorus in its DNA and other biomolecules, such as proteins.

24 Comments

Vaccines

By | June 1, 2011

Looking back, looking ahead

18 Comments

image: The Last Vaccine Frontier

The Last Vaccine Frontier

By | June 1, 2011

Successful vaccines have been created to protect against pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Why aren’t there any for combating fungal infections?

3 Comments

image: Recognizing the Human Potential

Recognizing the Human Potential

By | June 1, 2011

It may be time to reconsider an AIDS vaccine which is more human than viral, triggering the immune system in a way that no other vaccine does.

12 Comments

image: Shooting Down Addiction

Shooting Down Addiction

By | June 1, 2011

A new breed of vaccines aims to wean users off cocaine.

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image: Track Your Package

Track Your Package

By | June 1, 2011

How to follow stem cells transplanted into living tissue.

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image: A Shot in the Arm

A Shot in the Arm

By | June 1, 2011

Decades of vaccine research have expanded our understanding of the immune system and are yielding novel disease-fighting tactics.

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