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» bioluminescence, microbiology and ecology

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image: Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

By | August 21, 2014

Marine viruses may be key players in the death of massive algal blooms that emerge in the ocean, a study shows.

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image: Bioluminescence Researcher Dies

Bioluminescence Researcher Dies

By | August 12, 2014

Harvard biochemist J. Woodland Hastings, who first theorized about quorum sensing in the late 1960s, succumbed to pulmonary fibrosis last week at age 87.

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image: Microbes in a Tar Pit

Microbes in a Tar Pit

By | August 8, 2014

Microdroplets of water in a natural asphalt lake are home to active microbial life, a study shows.

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image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

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image: Metagenomics Mash-Up

Metagenomics Mash-Up

By | August 1, 2014

A tour of the newest software and strategies for analyzing microbial and viral communities

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image: Small Packages

Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

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image: The Body’s Ecosystem

The Body’s Ecosystem

By | August 1, 2014

Research on the human microbiome is booming, and scientists have moved from simply taking stock of gut flora to understanding the influence of microbes throughout the body.

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image: Abundant, Widespread Virus Discovered

Abundant, Widespread Virus Discovered

By | July 29, 2014

Scientists identify a bacteriophage that is highly abundant in the gut bacteria of people around the world.

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image: Week in Review: July 21–25

Week in Review: July 21–25

By | July 25, 2014

Blood-based Alzheimer’s diagnostics; CRISPR cuts out HIV; Leishmania and the sand fly microbiome; deconstructing the lionfish science fair debacle

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image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

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