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image: Radical Reversal

Radical Reversal

By | July 6, 2011

Free radicals, widely believed to promote cancer, may actually slow tumor growth.

54 Comments

image: Top 7 in Cancer Biology

Top 7 in Cancer Biology

By | July 6, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in cancer biology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

0 Comments

image: Air Pollution Stunts Cognition

Air Pollution Stunts Cognition

By | July 6, 2011

Particulates in the air can cause impaired learning and depression in mice.

21 Comments

Brain Cells Self-Amplify

By | July 5, 2011

A certain type of neural precursor does it all—replaces itself, differentiates into specialized brain cells, and multiplies into more stem-cell-like cells.

0 Comments

image: Pain-Free Love

Pain-Free Love

By | July 1, 2011

Love can buffer people from pain by invoking feelings of safety and reassurance.

0 Comments

image: The Birth of Optogenetics

The Birth of Optogenetics

By | July 1, 2011

An account of the path to realizing tools for controlling brain circuits with light.

32 Comments

image: Exosome Explosion

Exosome Explosion

By | July 1, 2011

These small membrane vesicles do much more than clean up a cell’s trash—they also carry signals to distant parts of the body, where they can impact multiple dimensions of cellular life.

6 Comments

image: Americans Support Stem Cell Research

Americans Support Stem Cell Research

By | July 1, 2011

A new study finds that more than two thirds of Americans approve of the use of stem cells in research aiming to cure serious diseases.

1 Comment

image: OPSINS: Tools of the trade

OPSINS: Tools of the trade

By | July 1, 2011

The optogenetic toolset is composed of genetically encoded molecules that, when targeted to specific neurons in the brain, enable the electrical activity of those neurons to be driven or silenced by light. 

0 Comments

image: C-ing with the Lights Out

C-ing with the Lights Out

By | July 1, 2011

I the dark Arctic shallows one research finds heterotrophic marine bacteria doing a surprising amount of carbon fixing.

0 Comments

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