Most Recent

image: To Study Unfettered

To Study Unfettered

By | July 1, 2014

Researching the causes of sexual orientation should be guided by scientific, not social, concerns.

5 Comments

image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

13 Comments

image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: June 23–27

Week in Review: June 23–27

By | June 27, 2014

Tracking chikungunya virus; reconsidering wood decay-based fungal classification; ASC specks spread inflammation; antibiotic tolerance in E. coli; RIKEN review yields corrections

0 Comments

image: Omnivore Ancestors?

Omnivore Ancestors?

By | June 26, 2014

Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat and vegetables.

0 Comments

image: Mobile Microbiome

Mobile Microbiome

By | June 26, 2014

Cell phones are populated with many bacteria commonly found on users’ hands. 

0 Comments

image: Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

By | June 25, 2014

E. coli repeatedly exposed to ampicillin adapt to stay dormant for longer periods of time—just long enough to outlast the antibiotic treatment.

1 Comment

image: Re-examining Rots

Re-examining Rots

By | June 23, 2014

Fungi that digest wood in novel ways could fuel new avenues of research on cellulosic ethanol, and suggest a need to move beyond traditional classification systems.  

1 Comment

image: Clinical ’Omes

Clinical ’Omes

By | June 20, 2014

Report provides primer on using clinical genome and exome sequencing technologies.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: June 16–20

Week in Review: June 16–20

By | June 20, 2014

Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
  4. Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall
AAAS