The Scientist

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image: Chance and Necessity

Chance and Necessity

By | November 1, 2013

War and justice brought together two of the greatest minds of the 20th century, a scientist and a writer.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Cortex Tour

Cortex Tour

By | November 1, 2013

Travel through the outer layers of a mouse brain thanks to array tomography and Stanford University's Stephen Smith.

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image: Seeing Double

Seeing Double

By | November 1, 2013

Combining two imaging techniques integrates molecular specificity with nanometer-scale resolution.  

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image: Synapses on Stage

Synapses on Stage

By | November 1, 2013

Light microscopy techniques that spotlight neural connections in the brain

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image: Penetrating the Brain

Penetrating the Brain

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers use molecular keys, chisels, and crowbars to open the last great biochemical barricade in the body—the blood-brain barrier.

3 Comments

image: Evolving Pain Resistance

Evolving Pain Resistance

By | October 24, 2013

Grasshopper mice harbor mutations in a pain-transmitting sodium channel that allow them to prey on highly toxic bark scorpions.

2 Comments

image: FDA Considers Three-Parent IVF

FDA Considers Three-Parent IVF

By | October 17, 2013

The US regulatory agency will meet next week to discuss whether to allow human trials of a technique that combines the genetic information of three adults.

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image: Fighting Viruses with RNAi

Fighting Viruses with RNAi

By | October 10, 2013

The long-debated issue of whether mammals can use RNA interference as an antiviral defense mechanism is finally put to rest.

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image: Mislabeled Microbes Cause Two Retractions

Mislabeled Microbes Cause Two Retractions

By | October 10, 2013

Two papers on plant immunity have been retracted, and questions remain about others with similar results. 

9 Comments

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