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» microscopy and developmental biology

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: High-Speed Intracellular Imaging

High-Speed Intracellular Imaging

By | October 23, 2014

A new kind of microscopy uses a lattice of light to visualize biological processes with extraordinary spatial and temporal resolution.

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image: A Conversation with a Laureate

A Conversation with a Laureate

By | October 13, 2014

The Scientist speaks with W.E. Moerner, who last week shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on super-resolution molecular imaging.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: 2014 Top 10 Innovations: Last Chance to Submit

2014 Top 10 Innovations: Last Chance to Submit

By | September 15, 2014

The Scientist’s annual search for the best and brightest life science innovations is drawing to a close. Submit your new product or methodology today for a chance to win!

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Ruben Gonzalez Jr.: Molecular Visualizer

Ruben Gonzalez Jr.: Molecular Visualizer

By | September 1, 2014

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry, Columbia University. Age 42

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Next Generation: See-through Mice

Next Generation: See-through Mice

By | July 31, 2014

An improved tissue-clearing technique makes whole animals transparent.

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