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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Leukemia Under the Lens, 1845

Leukemia Under the Lens, 1845

By | April 1, 2015

Alfred Donné’s microscopic daguerreotypes described the cellular symptoms of leukemia for the first time.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: <em>Apiarium</em>, 1625

Apiarium, 1625

By | March 1, 2015

Galileo’s improvements to the microscope led to the first published observations using such an instrument.

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image: Time-Lapse on the Cheap

Time-Lapse on the Cheap

By | February 1, 2015

A PhD student jury-rigs a microscopy system for high-throughput cell motility assays.

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image: Zooming In

Zooming In

By | January 20, 2015

To improve the reach of optical microscopy, researchers are enlarging the biological features they wish to view.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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image: Micro Master

Micro Master

By | January 1, 2015

Thomas Deerinck has been at the helm of a microscope for more than four decades. And he’s got lots to show for it, including a half a dozen placements in the Nikon Small World competition.

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image: Picturing Infection

Picturing Infection

By | January 1, 2015

Whole-animal, light-based imaging of infected small mammals

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