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» microscopy and developmental biology

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image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

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image: “Alive” and In Focus

“Alive” and In Focus

By | October 1, 2012

Imaging viruses in action

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image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

image: The Sharper Image

The Sharper Image

By | October 1, 2012

Advances in light microscopy allow the mapping of cell migration during embryogenesis and capture dynamic processes at the cellular level.

1 Comment

image: Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

By | September 17, 2012

Mice raised in isolation from their mothers developed cognitive deficits similar to those of babies raised in orphanages where physical contact is infrequent.

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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Of Frogs and Embryos

Of Frogs and Embryos

By | September 1, 2012

Associate Professor in Molecular Cell & Developmental Biology at the University of Texas at Austin, John Wallingford, makes his living using cutting-edge microscopic techniques to watch developmental events unfold in real time.

4 Comments

image: Taking the Long View

Taking the Long View

By | September 1, 2012

In exploring how embryos take shape, John Wallingford has identified a key pathway involved in vertebrate development—and human disease.

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image: Lymphatic Lines

Lymphatic Lines

By | August 1, 2012

Lymphatic vessels grow towards two chemokines, revealing signals that could be important in cancer metastasis.

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image: Milling Magic

Milling Magic

By | August 1, 2012

Ion beams carve slices in frozen cells, giving biologists an interior view.

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