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image: Elsevier Hacked, Papers Retracted

Elsevier Hacked, Papers Retracted

By | December 12, 2012

Fake peer reviews were submitted to Elsevier due to a glitch in the publisher's security system, resulting in the retraction of 11 papers.

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image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

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image: NYU Still Recovering from Sandy

NYU Still Recovering from Sandy

By | December 7, 2012

NYU’s Langone Medical Center continues to struggle from the lasting impact of the 15-foot storm surge that accompanied the recent hurricane.

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image: The Scientist’s 2012 Geeky Gift Guide

The Scientist’s 2012 Geeky Gift Guide

By | December 6, 2012

Find the perfect present for the dedicated (or budding) scientists in your life

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image: Hand Signs for Science

Hand Signs for Science

By | December 5, 2012

Organizations are calling for a common set of sign language for scientific terms.

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Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

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image: Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

By | December 1, 2012

In the introduction to his latest book, renowned naturalist George Schaller describes the evolving role of the field biologist through the lens of his experiences with Himalayan wildlife.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: High on High Content

High on High Content

By | December 1, 2012

A guide to some new and improved high-content screening systems

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image: Hit Parade

Hit Parade

By | December 1, 2012

Cell-based assays are popular for high-throughput screens, where they strike a balance between ease of use and similarity to the human body that researchers aim to treat.

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