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image: Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

By | November 26, 2013

The state assembles a task force to try to slow the growth of burgeoning populations of the ecologically destructive invasive species.

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image: Cortex Tour

Cortex Tour

By | November 1, 2013

Travel through the outer layers of a mouse brain thanks to array tomography and Stanford University's Stephen Smith.

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image: Seeing Double

Seeing Double

By | November 1, 2013

Combining two imaging techniques integrates molecular specificity with nanometer-scale resolution.  

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image: Synapses on Stage

Synapses on Stage

By | November 1, 2013

Light microscopy techniques that spotlight neural connections in the brain

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image: Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

By | October 29, 2013

New evidence indicates that invasive Asian carp have bred in the Lake Erie basin.

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image: EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

By | October 25, 2013

The European Parliament rejected a proposal designed to fund the construction of new fishing boats, instead opting to fund a project that aims to curtail overfishing.

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image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

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image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

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image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

3 Comments

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