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image: A Conversation with a Laureate

A Conversation with a Laureate

By | October 13, 2014

The Scientist speaks with W.E. Moerner, who last week shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on super-resolution molecular imaging.

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image: Contributors


By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: 2014 Top 10 Innovations: Last Chance to Submit

2014 Top 10 Innovations: Last Chance to Submit

By | September 15, 2014

The Scientist’s annual search for the best and brightest life science innovations is drawing to a close. Submit your new product or methodology today for a chance to win!


image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.


image: Ruben Gonzalez Jr.: Molecular Visualizer

Ruben Gonzalez Jr.: Molecular Visualizer

By | September 1, 2014

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry, Columbia University. Age 42

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.


image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.


image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.


image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.


image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.


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