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image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.

2 Comments

image: Reassessing One Really Old Fish

Reassessing One Really Old Fish

By | January 13, 2015

New analysis of an ancient specimen prompts a rethink of fish forebears.

1 Comment

image: The Benefits of Being a “Bearded Lady”

The Benefits of Being a “Bearded Lady”

By | January 8, 2015

A study of female eastern fence lizards that bear a distinctly male trait yields tantalizing clues about the tradeoffs involved in blurring the lines of sexual dimorphism.

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image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

4 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Micro Master

Micro Master

By | January 1, 2015

Thomas Deerinck has been at the helm of a microscope for more than four decades. And he’s got lots to show for it, including a half a dozen placements in the Nikon Small World competition.

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image: Performance Art

Performance Art

By | January 1, 2015

Regulation of genome expression orchestrates the behavior of insect castes and the human response to social stress.

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image: Picturing Infection

Picturing Infection

By | January 1, 2015

Whole-animal, light-based imaging of infected small mammals

4 Comments

image: Why, Oh Y?

Why, Oh Y?

By | January 1, 2015

A toothpick and a bit of chance shaped David Page’s career, which he has dedicated to understanding the mammalian Y chromosome and fetal germ cell development.

0 Comments

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