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image: Who Is Immune to Zika?

Who Is Immune to Zika?

By | October 11, 2016

Researchers tap into ongoing dengue studies to improve antibody-based diagnostic tests for Zika and address unanswered questions about the emerging virus’s epidemiology.

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image: Study: Enriched Housing Changes Murine T Cells

Study: Enriched Housing Changes Murine T Cells

By | October 3, 2016

Mice that live in a more-stimulating environment for two weeks appear to develop a more-inflammatory immune state that might help protect the animals against infection. 

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image: An Evolutionary History

An Evolutionary History

By | October 1, 2016

Celebrating 30 years and a resurrection

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image: Saving Jon

Saving Jon

By | October 1, 2016

Meet the researcher/entrepreneur who started a nonprofit that seeks to solve the science behind a rare disease that threatens the life of her younger brother.

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image: Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

By | October 1, 2016

From confocal fluorescence microscopy to super-resolution and live 3-D imaging, microscopes have changed rapidly since 1986.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

By | September 21, 2016

Caffeine-producing plants use three different biochemical pathways and two different enzyme families to make the same molecule.

2 Comments

image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Stingrays Chew Too

Stingrays Chew Too

By | September 15, 2016

Researchers observe stingrays moving their jaws to grind up prey, a behavior thought to be restricted to mammals.

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image: Week in Review: September 5–9

Week in Review: September 5–9

By | September 9, 2016

Environmental magnetite in the human brain; prion structure takes shape; watching E. coli evolve in real time; learning from others’ behavior 

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