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image: On the Chain Gang

On the Chain Gang

By | July 1, 2012

More than simply helping haul out a cell’s garbage, ubiquitin, with its panoply of chain lengths and shapes, marks and regulates many unrelated cellular processes.

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image: Sweet Smell of Success

Sweet Smell of Success

By | July 1, 2012

With persistence and pluck, Leslie Vosshall managed to snatch insect odorant receptors from the jaws of experimental defeat.

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image: The Little Cell That Could

The Little Cell That Could

By | July 1, 2012

Critics point out that cell therapy has yet to top existing treatments. Biotech companies are setting out to change that—and prove that the technology can revolutionize medicine.

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image: Ubiquitin basics

Ubiquitin basics

By | July 1, 2012

Despite its discovery as a protein that seems to show up everywhere, at least in eukaryotic cells, researchers are only beginning to scratch the surface of all of the cellular functions involving ubiquitin. 

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image: Flower Barcodes

Flower Barcodes

By | June 28, 2012

Wales creates a database of DNA barcodes for all of its native flowering plants, hoping to guide conservation and drug development efforts.

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image: Five Mutations Make H5N1 Airborne

Five Mutations Make H5N1 Airborne

By | June 21, 2012

The second of the two controversial bird flu papers is published in Science, revealing that just five mutations can render the virus transmissible between ferrets.

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image: Roundup from Microbiology Meeting

Roundup from Microbiology Meeting

By | June 21, 2012

Some of the interesting stories researchers were discussing at this year’s American Society of Microbiology meeting in San Francisco.

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image: Stem Cells from Corpses

Stem Cells from Corpses

By | June 15, 2012

Researchers pull viable cells from bodies that had been dead for more than 2 weeks.

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image: Older Dads Have Healthier Kids?

Older Dads Have Healthier Kids?

By | June 11, 2012

New research finds that older men have children and grandchildren with longer telomeres, possibly pointing to health benefits of delayed reproduction.

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image: Discovering Phasmids

Discovering Phasmids

By | June 9, 2012

Shortly after a rat infested supply ship ran around in Lord Howe Island off the east coast of Australia in 1918, the newly introduced mammals wiped out the island's phasmids—stick insects the size of a human hand. 

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