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» microscopy and evolution

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image: Palade Particles, 1955

Palade Particles, 1955

By | February 1, 2014

Electron microscopy led to the first identification of what would later be known as ribosomes.

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image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

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image: Palade and His Particles

Palade and His Particles

By | February 1, 2014

Nobel Laureate Christian de Duve discusses the impact of George Palade’s work on ribosomes.

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image: New River Dolphin

New River Dolphin

By | January 27, 2014

DNA sequencing study reveals a new river dolphin species in South America.

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image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

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image: The Shared Perfumes of Queens

The Shared Perfumes of Queens

By | January 16, 2014

Ant, bee, and wasp queens emit a similar class of pheromones that sterilize their workers, hinting at a shared ancestry for these chemicals.

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image: Clocks Versus Rocks

Clocks Versus Rocks

By | January 14, 2014

A new analysis suggests that placental mammals originated while dinosaurs were dominant, contradicting a recent high-profile study.

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image: Human-Pathogen Coevolution

Human-Pathogen Coevolution

By | January 13, 2014

Helicobacter pylori strains that share ancestry with their human hosts are less likely to cause severe disease.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.

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image: Drawn to Controversy

Drawn to Controversy

By | January 1, 2014

By digging through dusty storerooms and reading dead people’s mail, science historian and philosopher Michael Dietrich keeps biologists attuned to the past and mindful of the present.

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