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Chemistry Nobel goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson. 

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image: Image of the Day: Embryonic Ripples

Image of the Day: Embryonic Ripples

By | July 26, 2017

This fluttering clump of colorful cells is a zebrafish embryo, visualized by many stacked images.

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image: Image of the Day: A Swell Idea

Image of the Day: A Swell Idea

By | July 19, 2017

To improve the resolution of biological samples at the cellular level, researchers inflate tissues with “swellable polymers” so that they’re easier to see under the microscope.    

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image: Image of the Day: Skinning the Cat

Image of the Day: Skinning the Cat

By | July 17, 2017

This stack of polarized light micrographs depicts a vibrant ensemble of tissues, hair follicles, and vessels within a slice of cat skin.

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Synaptic connections and a new neuron type emerge in high-res images, which hold promise for mapping the complete connectome.

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image: Image of the Day: Colorful Crystals

Image of the Day: Colorful Crystals

By | April 27, 2017

Thecla opisena butterfly wings get their unique luster from the crystalline structures in their scales (bottom right).

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image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

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image: 2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

By | December 1, 2016

These runners up to the Top 10 Innovations of 2016 caught our judges' attention.

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2016

Top 10 Innovations 2016

By | December 1, 2016

This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

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image: Electron Micrographs Get a Dash of Color

Electron Micrographs Get a Dash of Color

By | November 3, 2016

A new technique creates colorful stains that label proteins and cellular structures at higher resolution than ever before possible. 

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