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image: Thermo Fisher to Acquire FEI

Thermo Fisher to Acquire FEI

By | June 1, 2016

In a $4.2 billion deal, the science equipment giant is buying the Hillsboro, Oregon-based electron microscope maker.

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image: Observing Nascent Neurons in Action

Observing Nascent Neurons in Action

By | March 14, 2016

Scientists image the activity of adult-born neurons in the brains of waking mice, and reveal roles for the cells in learning and memory.

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image: Renowned Microscopist Dies

Renowned Microscopist Dies

By | January 14, 2016

Michael Davidson, a microphotographer at Florida State University, has passed away at age 65.

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image: Top Technical Advances 2015

Top Technical Advances 2015

By | December 24, 2015

The Scientist’s choice of major improvements in imaging, optogenetics, single-cell analyses, and CRISPR

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image: Imaging Live Tissue Without Fluorescence

Imaging Live Tissue Without Fluorescence

By | October 30, 2015

Modifying a vibration-based optical technique can capture images of living tissues, researchers show. 

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image: Imaging Entire Organisms

Imaging Entire Organisms

By | October 26, 2015

A new microscope allows researchers to watch biological processes at the cellular level in 3-D in living animals. 

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image: Leukemia Under the Lens, 1845

Leukemia Under the Lens, 1845

By | April 1, 2015

Alfred Donné’s microscopic daguerreotypes described the cellular symptoms of leukemia for the first time.

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image: <em>Apiarium</em>, 1625

Apiarium, 1625

By | March 1, 2015

Galileo’s improvements to the microscope led to the first published observations using such an instrument.

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image: Time-Lapse on the Cheap

Time-Lapse on the Cheap

By | February 1, 2015

A PhD student jury-rigs a microscopy system for high-throughput cell motility assays.

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image: Zooming In

Zooming In

By | January 20, 2015

To improve the reach of optical microscopy, researchers are enlarging the biological features they wish to view.

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