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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

By | November 19, 2015

A shorter crease in the medial prefrontal cortex is linked with a higher risk of schizophrenics experiencing hallucinations.

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image: Rewarding Companions

Rewarding Companions

By | October 26, 2015

Oxytocin and social contact together modulate endocannabinoid activity in the mouse brain, which could help explain the prosocial effects of marijuana use. 

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Dopamine Distress and Obesity

Dopamine Distress and Obesity

By | September 14, 2015

A genetic predisposition toward learning poorly from negative outcomes may influence behaviors leading to weight gain, a study shows.

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image: Hormone Affects “Runner’s High”

Hormone Affects “Runner’s High”

By | September 2, 2015

Leptin, the satiety hormone produced by fat, affects neuronal signaling in the mouse brain; interference with this pathway can influence the rewarding effects of running in the animals.

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