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image: The Celiac Surge

The Celiac Surge

By | June 1, 2017

A rapid increase in the global incidence of the condition has researchers scrambling to understand the causes of the trend, and cope with the consequences.

4 Comments

Congress is not expected to fully enact the proposed cuts to research and public health programs.

1 Comment

image: Life Science Leaders Meet at White House

Life Science Leaders Meet at White House

By | May 8, 2017

Heads of academia and industry mingled with the vice president and the secretary of Health and Human Services at a biotech summit.

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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image: Congress Agrees to Give NIH $2 Billion Extra

Congress Agrees to Give NIH $2 Billion Extra

By | May 1, 2017

The proposed spending plan for 2017 includes money for Alzheimer’s and cancer research.

1 Comment

Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

1 Comment

Both Democrats and Republications criticize the Trump administration’s plan to cut funding for biomedical research.

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image: Drastic Cuts to Brazil’s Federal Science Budget

Drastic Cuts to Brazil’s Federal Science Budget

By | April 4, 2017

The 44 percent drop in funding is disproportionately large compared to overall reductions in government spending.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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