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image: Show Me Your Moves

Show Me Your Moves

By | May 1, 2015

Updated classics and new techniques help microbiologists get up close and quantitative.

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image: The Origins of O

The Origins of O

By | May 1, 2015

A strain of HIV that has afflicted more than 100,000 people emerged from gorillas.

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image: Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

By | April 28, 2015

Reengineered protein-shuttling machinery can be used to inject a particular protein into mammalian cells, according to a proof-of-principle study.

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image: How a Popular Probiotic Works

How a Popular Probiotic Works

By | April 16, 2015

Eating a type of bacterium encourages the activity of other gut microbes, according to a small study.

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image: Enzyme Improves CRISPR

Enzyme Improves CRISPR

By | April 1, 2015

A smaller Cas9 protein enables in vivo genome engineering via viral vectors.

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image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

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image: Professional Marksman

Professional Marksman

By | April 1, 2015

Charles Sawyers, who began his research career just as the genetic details of human oncogenes were emerging, codeveloped Gleevec, the quintessential targeted cancer therapy.

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image: Signaling Resistance

Signaling Resistance

By | April 1, 2015

Activating signaling pathways, rather than individual genes, reveals roles for both growth and dedifferentiation in establishing resistance to cancer treatments.

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image: Toggling Between Life and Death

Toggling Between Life and Death

By | April 1, 2015

In estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, the transcription factor IRF1 tips the balance between cellular suicide and survival through autophagy.

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