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» Nobel Prize and neuroscience

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image: Ready for Prime Time

Ready for Prime Time

By | February 1, 2012

Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease are ready for widespread use in clinical trials.

1 Comment

image: Low Oxygen Saves Irradiated Brain?

Low Oxygen Saves Irradiated Brain?

By | January 18, 2012

Whole brain radiation therapy costs mice some of their cognitive abilities, but treatment with low-oxygen air revives their reasoning skills.

9 Comments

image: Early Signs of Alzheimers

Early Signs of Alzheimers

By | January 13, 2012

Proteins that appear before patients show symptoms of the disease could offer clues to the disease process.

0 Comments

image: Ever Wonder…

Ever Wonder…

By | January 10, 2012

How does catnip work?

3 Comments

image: Animal Mind Control

Animal Mind Control

By | January 1, 2012

Examples of parasites that manipulate the behavior of their hosts are not hard to come by, but scientists have only recently begun to understand how they induce such dramatic changes.

40 Comments

image: Resolving Chronic Pain

Resolving Chronic Pain

By | January 1, 2012

The body’s own mechanism for dispersing the inflammatory reaction might lead to new treatments for chronic pain.

76 Comments

image: Inflammation, Pain, and Resolvins

Inflammation, Pain, and Resolvins

By | January 1, 2012

Not all inflammation leads to pain. Despite widespread infection followed by fever, colds rarely cause pain. But when some cytokines and certain immune cells are active near pain-sensing nerves, they trigger receptors that convey pain sensations to the brain.

0 Comments

image: Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s

Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s

By | January 1, 2012

How Nobel Laureate Barbara McClintock nearly gave up genetics for meteorology

12 Comments

image: Top People of 2011

Top People of 2011

By | December 21, 2011

The Scientist recounts the year’s top science prize winners and top-notch scientists that passed away.

15 Comments

image: Unsilencing a Gene

Unsilencing a Gene

By | December 21, 2011

Scientists have found a way to reactivate a gene in mice that is silenced in a neurodevelopmental disorder called Angelman syndrome.

3 Comments

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