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image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

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image: Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

By | November 6, 2013

Researchers show that the prevalence of one genus of bacteria correlates with the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

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image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

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image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

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image: Bad Blood

Bad Blood

By | November 1, 2013

A rare bleeding disorder leads scientists to uncover an unusual blood component that might be common to us all.

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image: Exploring the Neuron Forest

Exploring the Neuron Forest

By | November 1, 2013

Innovations in imaging techniques and genetic sequencing take neuroscience to a new level.

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image: Lozano on DBS

Lozano on DBS

By | November 1, 2013

Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano discusses deep-brain stimulation in this TEDx talk.

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image: The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers are piecing together the devilishly complex sets of genetic alterations underlying schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

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image: Waste-Management Consultant

Waste-Management Consultant

By | November 1, 2013

By audaciously pursuing an abandoned area of research, Ana María Cuervo discovered how cells selectively break down their waste, and revealed the health consequences when that process malfunctions.

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