The Scientist

» Nobel Prize, culture and evolution

Most Recent

image: More Evidence MERS Came from Bats

More Evidence MERS Came from Bats

By | October 10, 2013

Genomic analysis suggests that the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus circulated among bats for a while before jumping to humans.  

0 Comments

image: Computational Chemistry Wins Nobel

Computational Chemistry Wins Nobel

By | October 9, 2013

Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of computer-based methods to model complex systems.

2 Comments

image: Vesicle Trafficking Trio Wins Nobel

Vesicle Trafficking Trio Wins Nobel

By | October 7, 2013

James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof share Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology.  

3 Comments

image: Bonding in the Lab

Bonding in the Lab

By | October 1, 2013

How to make your lab less like a factory and more like a family

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Evolution and Medicine</em>

Book Excerpt from Evolution and Medicine

By | October 1, 2013

In Chapter 11, “Man-made diseases,” author Robert Perlman describes how socioeconomic health disparities arise in hierarchical societies.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | October 1, 2013

Perv, Behind the Shock Machine, The Gaia Hypothesis, and Life at the Speed of Light

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2013 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2013

October 2013's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

By | October 1, 2013

Professor, Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago. Age: 38

3 Comments

image: Nobel Laureate Dies

Nobel Laureate Dies

By | September 26, 2013

David Hubel, who helped revolutionize the understanding of visual information processing, has passed away at age 87.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS