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image: Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel

Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel

By | October 5, 2015

William Campbell, Satoshi Omura, and Youyou Tu have won this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in recognition of their contributions to antiparasitic drug development.

4 Comments

image: Ready, Willing, and Able

Ready, Willing, and Able

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers with disabilities are making their fields more accessible.

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image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 24, 2015

The information firm uses citation statistics to forecast potential winners of the 2015 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and Physiology or Medicine.

4 Comments

image: Study: Men Get Bigger Start-Up Packages

Study: Men Get Bigger Start-Up Packages

By | September 17, 2015

A new analysis reveals yet another gender gap in science.

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image: Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

By | September 3, 2015

Online scientific journals are sacrificing the quality of research articles to make a buck.

3 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2015

Brain Storms, Orphan, Maize for the Gods, and Paranoid.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2015

September 2015's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Watching Live Cells

Watching Live Cells

By | August 28, 2015

An international team brings the new technology of super-resolution imaging to the world of the living.

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image: Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

By | August 27, 2015

Scientific journals that publish papers with snappier titles accrue more citations per paper, according to a report.

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image: Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down

Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down

By | August 24, 2015

Academic research could be strengthened by thinking more and doing less.

5 Comments

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