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image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 21, 2016

According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

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image: Continued Fallout from Macchiarini Misconduct

Continued Fallout from Macchiarini Misconduct

By | September 7, 2016

The sacked researcher and surgeon was not properly vetted by the Swedish institutions that hired him in 2010, according to an independent review panel. 

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

By | August 31, 2016

One of the pioneers in developing fluorescent proteins for biological studies was 64 years old.

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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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image: Nobel Laureate Dies

Nobel Laureate Dies

By | August 5, 2016

Chemist Ahmed Zewail, the “father of femtochemistry,” has passed away at age 70.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>

Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons

By | August 1, 2016

In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.

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