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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Results from experiments in mice revise a long-held hypothesis that certain protein scaffolds are needed for synaptic activity.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | November 1, 2016

Nobel's diversity problem, Brexit and science, letters of recommendation skew sexist, and NIH's public perception troubles

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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The ribosome-associated organelle consists of tightly packed tubes, not flat sheets as previously believed, according to new super-resolution microscopy images.

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image: Week in Review: October 17–21

Week in Review: October 17–21

By | October 21, 2016

Report finds that pathologist involved in anonymous defamation case committed multiple acts of misconduct; growing eggs from stem cells; neutrophils’ role in metastasis; convergent evolution in birds

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image: Promiscuous Mice Have Extra-Fast Sperm

Promiscuous Mice Have Extra-Fast Sperm

By | October 19, 2016

The tails of polygamous deer mice sperm have longer midsections than the sperm tails of monogamous individuals of a similar species, and this correlates with improved swimming and competitive ability.

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image: Cellular Cartography

Cellular Cartography

By | October 18, 2016

Researchers launch an initiative to generate a complete atlas of all cells in the human body.

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