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image: Opinion: Controlling Invasion

Opinion: Controlling Invasion

By | October 15, 2012

Remote sensing helps control an invasive giant weed that threatens ecosystems and border security.

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image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

1 Comment

image: G-Protein Receptor Work Wins Nobel

G-Protein Receptor Work Wins Nobel

By | October 10, 2012

Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka take home this year’s Nobel Prize for Chemistry for revealing how membrane receptors sense and respond to chemical signals.

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image: Has Science Outgrown the Nobels?

Has Science Outgrown the Nobels?

By | October 10, 2012

Amid Nobel Prize announcements this week, critics find awarding individuals in specific disciplines at odds with today’s interdisciplinary, team-led research.  

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | October 9, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka win this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for learning how to reboot cellular development. 

7 Comments

image: Cell Reprogramming Work Wins Nobel

Cell Reprogramming Work Wins Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka jointly take home this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for turning back the developmental clock. 

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image: Beard Beer

Beard Beer

By | October 4, 2012

A brewmaster is creating a signature concoction using yeast found in his facial hair.

2 Comments

image: Nobelist to Psychologists: Shape Up!

Nobelist to Psychologists: Shape Up!

By | October 3, 2012

Daniel Kahneman, who won a Nobel Prize in 2002, has issued a warning to a subset of his psychologist colleagues, telling them to increase the reproducibility of their research.

1 Comment

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

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