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image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

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image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

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image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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Top Scientists of 2013

By | December 25, 2013

The Scientist commemorates prize-winning life scientists and remembers notable researchers who died this year.

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image: Two-time Nobel Laureate Dies

Two-time Nobel Laureate Dies

By | November 20, 2013

Frederick Sanger, who pioneered amino acid and DNA sequencing techniques, has passed away at age 95.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Week in Review: October 7–11

Week in Review: October 7–11

By | October 11, 2013

Nobels awarded for vesicle trafficking and computational chemistry; building 3-D microbial communities; mislabeled microbes cause retractions

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image: Computational Chemistry Wins Nobel

Computational Chemistry Wins Nobel

By | October 9, 2013

Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of computer-based methods to model complex systems.

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