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» Nobel Prize and developmental biology

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image: How to Make Eyeball Stew

How to Make Eyeball Stew

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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image: Model Citizen

Model Citizen

By | March 1, 2012

With an eye to understanding animal regeneration, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado has turned a freshwater planarian into a model system to watch.

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image: The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

By | March 1, 2012

The first electron microscope to peer into an intact cell ushers in the new field of cell biology.

4 Comments

image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

3 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s

Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s

By | January 1, 2012

How Nobel Laureate Barbara McClintock nearly gave up genetics for meteorology

12 Comments

image: Top People of 2011

Top People of 2011

By | December 21, 2011

The Scientist recounts the year’s top science prize winners and top-notch scientists that passed away.

15 Comments

image: Nobel Winner’s Contribution Questioned

Nobel Winner’s Contribution Questioned

By | December 19, 2011

A coauthor of the key paper that led to one of this year’s Nobel Prizes for Physiology or Medicine claims the recipient wasn’t involved in the research.

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