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Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

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Nobel Laureates Back Obama

By | October 19, 2012

Nearly 70 Nobel Prize-winning scientists lend their support to the President’s re-election.

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image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

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image: G-Protein Receptor Work Wins Nobel

G-Protein Receptor Work Wins Nobel

By | October 10, 2012

Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka take home this year’s Nobel Prize for Chemistry for revealing how membrane receptors sense and respond to chemical signals.

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image: Has Science Outgrown the Nobels?

Has Science Outgrown the Nobels?

By | October 10, 2012

Amid Nobel Prize announcements this week, critics find awarding individuals in specific disciplines at odds with today’s interdisciplinary, team-led research.  

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image: Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka win this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for learning how to reboot cellular development. 

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image: Cell Reprogramming Work Wins Nobel

Cell Reprogramming Work Wins Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka jointly take home this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for turning back the developmental clock. 

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image: Nobelist to Psychologists: Shape Up!

Nobelist to Psychologists: Shape Up!

By | October 3, 2012

Daniel Kahneman, who won a Nobel Prize in 2002, has issued a warning to a subset of his psychologist colleagues, telling them to increase the reproducibility of their research.

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Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

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