The Scientist

» Nobel Prize and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Snubbed for a Nobel?

Snubbed for a Nobel?

By | March 14, 2013

A surgeon sues the Nobel Assembly for excluding him from last year’s prize awarded for regenerative science, but stem cell scientists are skeptical of his claims.

65 Comments

image: Science Loses Two More

Science Loses Two More

By | March 6, 2013

Oncologist Jane C. Wright and physics Nobel-winner Donald Glaser have died.

0 Comments

image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

2 Comments

image: What Ever Happened to Douglas Prasher?

What Ever Happened to Douglas Prasher?

By | February 26, 2013

The first researcher to clone the gene for green fluorescent protein, but who was passed over for the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, is back in academic science.

9 Comments

image: Lucrative Prize for Life Scientists

Lucrative Prize for Life Scientists

By | February 21, 2013

Three Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are offering $3 million to scientists demonstrating excellence in biology and medical research.

1 Comment

image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

1 Comment

image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

0 Comments

image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case
    Daily News Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

    The USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard retaining intellectual property rights covered by its patents for CRISPR gene-editing technology.

  2. Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation
  3. Humans Never Stopped Evolving
    Features Humans Never Stopped Evolving

    The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

  4. Abundant Sequence Errors in Public Databases
Business Birmingham