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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Discoverer of G Proteins Dies

Discoverer of G Proteins Dies

By | December 29, 2015

Nobel laureate Alfred Gilman has passed away at age 74.

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image: Antimalarial Drug Mechanism Explained

Antimalarial Drug Mechanism Explained

By | December 29, 2015

Artemisinin targets multiple parasite proteins after being activated by the iron in heme cofactors.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Nobel Laureate Dies

Nobel Laureate Dies

By | October 19, 2015

Richard Heck, pioneer of a reaction that binds carbon atoms using palladium, has passed away at age 84.

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: DNA Repair Pioneers Win Nobel

DNA Repair Pioneers Win Nobel

By | October 7, 2015

Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich, and Aziz Sancar have won this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work elucidating mechanisms of DNA repair.

11 Comments

image: TS Picks: October 5, 2015

TS Picks: October 5, 2015

By | October 5, 2015

Nobel Prizes edition

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