The Scientist

» Nobel Prize and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: High-Speed Intracellular Imaging

High-Speed Intracellular Imaging

By | October 23, 2014

A new kind of microscopy uses a lattice of light to visualize biological processes with extraordinary spatial and temporal resolution.


image: A Conversation with a Laureate

A Conversation with a Laureate

By | October 13, 2014

The Scientist speaks with W.E. Moerner, who last week shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on super-resolution molecular imaging.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: October 6–10

Week in Review: October 6–10

By | October 10, 2014

Nobel Prizes awarded; transgenerational effects of mitochondrial mutations; fat-targeted gene knockdown; Ebola updates in Spain and U.S.


image: Nanoscopy Wins Nobel

Nanoscopy Wins Nobel

By | October 8, 2014

Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner have won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy."


image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 25, 2014

Using citation statistics, the firm forecasts which researchers are likely to take home science’s top honors this year.


image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.


image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.


image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 


image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Genetic Test Solves Royal Mystery
    Notebook Genetic Test Solves Royal Mystery

    Genetic analyses lay to rest conspiracy theories about death of Belgian King Albert I, who lost his life in a rock climbing accident more than 80 years ago.

  2. Investigation Finds Pathologist Guilty of Systemic Misconduct
  3. Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia
  4. Curious George
    The Scientist Curious George

    George Church has consistently positioned himself at genomics’ leading edge.