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image: Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular

Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular

By | October 17, 2016

The unicellular ancestor of animals may have harbored some of the molecular tools that its many-celled descendants use to coordinate and direct cell differentiation and function, scientists show.

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Once implanted in mice, the edited stem cells produced normal hemoglobin.

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image: Molecular Machinists Win Nobel

Molecular Machinists Win Nobel

By | October 5, 2016

Chemists Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J. Fraser Stoddart, and Bernard Feringa are honored for their design and synthesis of molecular machines.

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image: When Nobel Laureates Earn Their Awards

When Nobel Laureates Earn Their Awards

By | October 3, 2016

Winners in the Physiology or Medicine category are trending older, even though they’re completing their award-winning research when they are about the same age, according to an analysis.

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image: Autophagy Pioneer Wins Nobel

Autophagy Pioneer Wins Nobel

By | October 3, 2016

Biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi is honored for his discoveries on the mechanisms of cellular recycling.

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image: Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

By | October 1, 2016

Companies focused on developing treatments for dogs, cats, and horses are bringing a diverse array of products to the pet medicine market.

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image: Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

By | October 1, 2016

As the importance of genomic copy number variations for health and disease becomes clearer, researchers are creating new ways to detect these changes in the genome.

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image: Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

By | September 30, 2016

Genetic variants on chromosome 26 appears to play a role in a dog’s tendency to turn to people for help.

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image: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

By | September 28, 2016

Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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The National Institutes of Health is hosting a two-day conference on how the virus affects infants and children. The take-home message so far: microcephaly is but one of many potential problems for Zika-exposed fetuses.

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