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image: A Matter of Size

A Matter of Size

By | August 1, 2014

Erroneous characterization of nanomaterials can misinform the study of a new medicine’s safety and efficacy.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Shocked</em>

Book Excerpt from Shocked

By | August 1, 2014

In Chapter 4, “Science fiction, space travel, and the strange science of suspended animation,” author David Casarett describes his brush with adenosine monophosphate and reanimated mice.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Feng Zhang: The Midas of Methods

Feng Zhang: The Midas of Methods

By | August 1, 2014

Core Member, Broad Institute; Investigator, McGovern Institute; Assistant Professor, MIT. Age: 32

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image: Say

Say "Aaaah"

By | August 1, 2014

Scientists aim to remotely monitor Parkinson’s through voice recordings.

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image: Small Packages

Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

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image: A Vaulted Mystery

A Vaulted Mystery

By | August 1, 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

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image: Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine

By , , and | August 1, 2014

From bioimaging to drug delivery and therapeutics, nanotechnology is poised to change the way doctors practice medicine.

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image: The Body’s Ecosystem

The Body’s Ecosystem

By | August 1, 2014

Research on the human microbiome is booming, and scientists have moved from simply taking stock of gut flora to understanding the influence of microbes throughout the body.

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image: Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

By | August 1, 2014

In praise of weird science at the edge of life

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