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image: Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

By | August 22, 2013

Layer-by-layer manufacturing techniques could help re-make human body parts, or produce entirely new biocompatible machines.

1 Comment

image: Engineered Hearts Beat

Engineered Hearts Beat

By | August 15, 2013

Human stem cells take up residence in mouse hearts stripped of their own components, restoring some of the organs’ function.

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image: Eat Less and Live Longer?

Eat Less and Live Longer?

By | August 13, 2013

Mice on a low-calorie diet harbor a distinct population of gut microorganisms that helps prolong life.

5 Comments

image: Lab-Grown Ear

Lab-Grown Ear

By | August 1, 2013

Scientists used a titanium wire framework to help ears made from collagen and sheep cartilage cells maintain their shape.

1 Comment

image: Cellular Pegs-in-Holes

Cellular Pegs-in-Holes

By | August 1, 2013

Cell-containing hydrogel shapes fit into a template to create an artificial tissue environment.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, July 15–19

Week in Review, July 15–19

By | July 19, 2013

Bias in preclinical research; medical marijuana for kids; a swath of microbial genomes; plastic ocean habitats; rethinking scientific evaluation

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image: Microbial Diversity

Microbial Diversity

By | July 14, 2013

By sequencing bacterial and archaeal genomes from single cells, scientists have filled in many uncharted branches of the tree of life.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

0 Comments

image: Gut Microbes for Life

Gut Microbes for Life

By | July 4, 2013

Most strains of gut microbes stay with us for decades, which may prove useful for tracking our health.

6 Comments

image: Foot Fungus Revealed

Foot Fungus Revealed

By | July 2, 2013

A new study profiles the garden of fungal organism that grows on human feet.

1 Comment

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