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image: Rebuilding Missing Muscle

Rebuilding Missing Muscle

By | April 30, 2014

An acellular matrix can help guide stem cells to injury sites and regrow muscles in both mice and humans, a study finds.

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image: Artificial Blood Is Patient-Ready

Artificial Blood Is Patient-Ready

By | April 16, 2014

In the midst of news that engineered organs are being implanted into animals and people, researchers announce the creation of artificial blood for transplant.

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image: Lab-Grown Muscle Self-Repairs

Lab-Grown Muscle Self-Repairs

By | April 8, 2014

Implanted into mice, lab-reared muscle made from stem cells can heal itself after an injury.  

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image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

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image: Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

By | March 19, 2014

Exposure to vitamin A in the womb influences immune system development and lifelong ability to fight infections, a mouse study shows. 

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image: Stem Cells Remember Substrates

Stem Cells Remember Substrates

By | March 16, 2014

The stiffness of a culture substrate affects the fates of stem cells.  

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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