Advertisement

The Scientist

» tissue engineering and immunology

Most Recent

image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

0 Comments

image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

1 Comment

image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

1 Comment

image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

1 Comment

image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Implanted Trachea Going Strong

Implanted Trachea Going Strong

By | October 23, 2013

Five years after receiving a tissue-engineered airway, the 30-year-old Colombian patient is doing well, having experienced no immunological complications associated with the procedure.

0 Comments

image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

0 Comments

image: Printing Ears

Printing Ears

By | September 1, 2013

Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar 3-D prints ears using “ink” that contains living cells.

2 Comments

image: Printing Life

Printing Life

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials.

0 Comments

image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

2 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Too Many Mitochondrial Genome Papers
  2. Antibiotics and the Gut Microbiome
  3. Sex Differences in Pain Pathway
  4. Anti-Vax Doctor Found Dead
    The Nutshell Anti-Vax Doctor Found Dead

    Police are calling the death of James Bradstreet, a physician who claimed vaccines cause autism and offered autism cures to patients, an apparent suicide.

Advertisement
Shimadzu Scientific
Shimadzu Scientific
Advertisement
The Scientist