The Scientist

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image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

2 Comments

image: Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

By | August 22, 2013

Layer-by-layer manufacturing techniques could help re-make human body parts, or produce entirely new biocompatible machines.

1 Comment

image: Engineered Hearts Beat

Engineered Hearts Beat

By | August 15, 2013

Human stem cells take up residence in mouse hearts stripped of their own components, restoring some of the organs’ function.

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image: Lab-Grown Ear

Lab-Grown Ear

By | August 1, 2013

Scientists used a titanium wire framework to help ears made from collagen and sheep cartilage cells maintain their shape.

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image: Cellular Pegs-in-Holes

Cellular Pegs-in-Holes

By | August 1, 2013

Cell-containing hydrogel shapes fit into a template to create an artificial tissue environment.

1 Comment

image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

3 Comments

image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

3 Comments

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