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August 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Life (Re)Cycle

Life (Re)Cycle

By | August 1, 2012

Death breeds life in the world’s most diverse and abundant group of animals.

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image: A Scientist Emerges

A Scientist Emerges

By | August 1, 2012

At age 16, Alexandra Sourakov has her first scientific publication, on the foraging behavior of butterflies.

3 Comments

image: Replacement Parts

Replacement Parts

By | August 1, 2012

To cope with a growing shortage of hearts, livers, and lungs suitable for transplant, some scientists are genetically engineering pigs, while others are growing organs in the lab.

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image: Tissue on Chips Galore

Tissue on Chips Galore

By | July 26, 2012

The National Institutes of Health will fund 17 projects developing lab-on-a-chip applications to improve drug screening.

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image: Microbial Perfume

Microbial Perfume

By | July 23, 2012

Rather than rely on plant-derived products, biotech companies are engineering bacteria and yeast to produce ingredients for fragrances.

4 Comments

image: Bio-engineered Jellyfish Swim

Bio-engineered Jellyfish Swim

By | July 22, 2012

Researchers create a swimming jellyfish mimic by reverse-engineering the creature's pumping action, paving the way for new methods of engineering replacement organs.

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image: Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

By | July 12, 2012

Guppies with experimentally shrunken brains produced more offspring than guppies bred for larger noggins, confirming a long suspected tradeoff of bigger brains.

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image: Genetic Shift in Salmon

Genetic Shift in Salmon

By | July 12, 2012

A new study finds that an Alaskan population of the fish has quickly evolved in response to warming temperatures.

1 Comment

image: War-born Climate Change

War-born Climate Change

By | July 3, 2012

A nuclear war could have profound effects on crops yields around the world, according to a new study.

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