The Scientist

» tissue engineering and ecology

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Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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Building Flesh and Blood

By | May 1, 2014

Understanding how networks of blood vessels form is key to engineering transplantable organs and tissues.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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Rebuilding Missing Muscle

By | April 30, 2014

An acellular matrix can help guide stem cells to injury sites and regrow muscles in both mice and humans, a study finds.

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Something Is Killing Asian Carp

By | April 29, 2014

Half a million invasive silver carp are dead in a Kentucky river, and nobody knows why.

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image: Artificial Blood Is Patient-Ready

Artificial Blood Is Patient-Ready

By | April 16, 2014

In the midst of news that engineered organs are being implanted into animals and people, researchers announce the creation of artificial blood for transplant.

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image: Lab-Grown Muscle Self-Repairs

Lab-Grown Muscle Self-Repairs

By | April 8, 2014

Implanted into mice, lab-reared muscle made from stem cells can heal itself after an injury.  

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2014

Cancer Virus, A Window on Eternity, Murderous Minds, and The Extreme Life of the Sea

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Python Auto-Pilot

By | March 20, 2014

Invasive snakes in Florida show evidence of a compass sense they use to navigate back to home territory.

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