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image: Back from the Blacklist?

Back from the Blacklist?

By | May 8, 2014

Disgraced psychology researcher Marc Hauser, who was found guilty of data fabrication and falsification during his time at Harvard, publishes two new papers.

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image: Not So Different

Not So Different

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unearth little evidence to suggest modern humans are superior to their Neanderthal ancestors.

4 Comments

image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Building Flesh and Blood

Building Flesh and Blood

By | May 1, 2014

Understanding how networks of blood vessels form is key to engineering transplantable organs and tissues.

2 Comments

image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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image: Rebuilding Missing Muscle

Rebuilding Missing Muscle

By | April 30, 2014

An acellular matrix can help guide stem cells to injury sites and regrow muscles in both mice and humans, a study finds.

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image: Artificial Blood Is Patient-Ready

Artificial Blood Is Patient-Ready

By | April 16, 2014

In the midst of news that engineered organs are being implanted into animals and people, researchers announce the creation of artificial blood for transplant.

6 Comments

image: Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

By | April 11, 2014

Researchers collate a list of the 100 most rare and unique avian species facing extinction.

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image: Lab-Grown Muscle Self-Repairs

Lab-Grown Muscle Self-Repairs

By | April 8, 2014

Implanted into mice, lab-reared muscle made from stem cells can heal itself after an injury.  

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image: Stripes Shoo Flies

Stripes Shoo Flies

By | April 4, 2014

Zebras evolved stripes to prevent pesky biting flies from landing on them, a study finds.

1 Comment

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