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image: Week in Review: September 2–6

Week in Review: September 2–6

By | September 6, 2013

More than 320,000 mammalian viruses lurk; evolution of echolocation in bats and dolphins; accumulation of mutations in drug-resistant tuberculosis; senior researchers reluctant to retire

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image: Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

By | September 4, 2013

Researchers find genome-wide evidence of convergent evolution between bats and dolphins.

3 Comments

image: Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

By | September 1, 2013

Researchers characterize drug-resistant tuberculosis by analyzing the genomes of more than 500 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from around the world.

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image: Printing Ears

Printing Ears

By | September 1, 2013

Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar 3-D prints ears using “ink” that contains living cells.

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image: Printing Life

Printing Life

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials.

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image: Putting the Men in Menopause

Putting the Men in Menopause

By | September 1, 2013

Can mating behavior explain the evolution of menopause in humans?

10 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2013

September 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Why Women Lose Fertility

Why Women Lose Fertility

By | September 1, 2013

Mating behavior is an unlikely driver of women's reproductive aging.

5 Comments

image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

2 Comments

image: Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

By | August 27, 2013

The transmission of reticuloendotheliosis viruses from mammals to birds was most likely an unexpected consequence of medical research.

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